SSI Related Question?

I have a brother who was recently approved for SSI. However, one of the restrictions I learned was that we cannot send money directly to his account via QuickPay [through computer or mobile]

Would it count against his account if I give him any extra money [we usually give everyone some cash on Christmas and

I have a brother who was recently approved for SSI. However, one of the restrictions I learned was that we cannot send money directly to his account via QuickPay [through computer or mobile]

Would it count against his account if I give him any extra money [we usually give everyone some cash on Christmas and Birthdays], but he deposits that into his account?

I ask because I have been having doubts about this as I think my idea might end up hurting him than helping him. Would it no longer make him eligible for his SSI payments?

Best Answer:

D: Anything he deposits in his account may count against him. He should not deposit the cash.

Other answer:

D:
If he gives you cash, just let him put it in his pocket.
tro:
gifts are gifts not indicated for his support
any time he is receiving SSI any type of money that is paid toward his support is considered other income and could result in a change in the SSI
I knew a lady whose house was fully paid off but her daughter took out a loan on it(had power of attorney) and when SSI found out payments were being made on a mortgage on her house they were going to adjust her SSI, the daughter had to step in and explain the money did not go for her mother's support but her own
Judith:
SSI (supplemental security income) is a federal WELFARE program which means that income and resources must be limited. Income over $754 a month will make him ineligible. If he is single, he can have up to $2000 in a bank account or in countable resources – if he has $2000 or more he is ineligible until he provide proof of spend down – and spend down must be on necessities.

He is required to report within 10 days the receipt of any income and if he has resources which equal or exceed $2000.

Obviously if you or anyone else sends him money, his need isn't as great as someone who doesn't have relatives or friends who can send money.

When it comes to income and resources, money received is income the month it is received; if it rolls over into another month then it becomes a resource. SSI disregards $20 of income received in a month. So if, for example, he received $500, then his SSI benefit would be reduced by $480.

He does not have to count small amounts of money given as gifts for Christmas or birthdays.

Some people confuse SSI and social security benefits. SSI isn't social security. If he were getting social security instead of SSI the receipt of income from family or friends would have no impact on his benefit amount of entitlement – unless the income results from his working.

You can always look this up yourself at ssa.gov or by querying SSI countable income.

D:
Florida
A Hunch:
To be eligible for SSI, your brother needs to be low income or have limited resources.
Limited resources means that someone else isn't supporting him.
I doubt that a regular birthday or christmas amount would be considered that. But if he has money to give you for special occasions, he shouldn't be eligible for a welfare program.
Katie:
WHICH STATE?

Yes, he reports anything more than "casual gifts" as income. Your State will have its own definition of "casual gifts."

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